Know your English

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prasen9
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Re: Know your English

Postby prasen9 » Mon Jun 21, 2010 3:43 am

suresh wrote:I wonder if it rude to point out someone's spelling mistakes in this forum? (I just did in another thread and hence the question.)
It may be a bit. But, I would rather someone point out a mistake I make rather than be polite. And anyway, something being rude has never stopped me from doing things if I believe that it is the thing to do. :D

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Re: Know your English

Postby jayakris » Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:41 am

My generel principal is not to loose patiance when I see mispelt words and bad usages of English. I just crinch, but stay quite. It is allright to put up with. Live and let die in piece..

Jay

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Re: Know your English

Postby prasen9 » Wed Jun 23, 2010 12:13 pm

And they say what is considered an error today will become the accepted language tomorrow. Given the lose use of loose :-), maybe lose will lose its spelling tomorrow to become loose and vice-versa. So, all Suresh has to do is to read the post tomorrow instead of today :-)

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Re: Know your English

Postby kujo » Wed Jun 23, 2010 3:16 pm

jayakris wrote:My generel principal is not to loose patiance when I see mispelt words and bad usages of English. I just crinch, but stay quite. It is allright to put up with. Live and let die in piece..

eeewwww :puke:

LOL

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Re: Know your English

Postby jayakris » Wed Jun 23, 2010 5:07 pm

You missed the fact that there was also poor grammar, up with which one must not put :) Jay

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Re: Know your English

Postby suresh » Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:24 pm

:rofl:

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Re: Know your English

Postby prasen9 » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:49 am

Nehru thought that English would be done away with. Here is an article from 1965 in The Time (U.S. magazine): http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,893559,00.html. (Isn't it wonderful to have archives of old papers on the web?). And here we are, 35 years later, people still trying to know their English on an Indian sports forum.

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Re: Know your English

Postby suresh » Sat Aug 21, 2010 5:00 am

Twitter breaks the verb barrier

The link above is a relatively old story. A recent post got me wondering about the standard usage of twitter as a verb and a bit of googling (:D ) lead me to the above article. If you don't want to click on the link, here is the quick answer: `to twitter' and `tweet' are the verb forms accepted by the Associated Press.

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Re: Know your English

Postby suresh » Sat Nov 06, 2010 10:09 am


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Re: Know your English

Postby jayakris » Sat Nov 06, 2010 3:25 pm

I am surprised that I knew that the word "shellac" had something to do with warnish/polish. I have no idea how/why I knew that... But in sports parlance, prople who use "shellack" probably think of "shelling" in a military sense; the word sounds like "elaborate shelling". I am surprised that the BBC article did not think of that connection.

In fact, I don't think anybody in the US thinks of the word with a similar feeling as "plastered". One can get plastered when one plays very poorly and the opponent just plays well - but one can get "shellacked" only when the opponent plays very well and aggressively beats you. In addition, "plastered" seems to be a term more apporpriate in individual sports (generally speaking) - as it seems difficult to think of a large team (like a football team, say) getting plastered to a wall while a single player can. But the Dallas Cowboys getting shelled all over the place on the field is easier to visualize. I think people make the conection to shelling more than plastering (or polishing) when they say shellack... Or may be it is just my feeling.

Jay

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Re: Know your English

Postby suresh » Sat Nov 06, 2010 11:55 pm

I just went through the entry for shellacking in the Mirriam Webster dictionary. According to them, the first use of this term is around 1931 and quotes plastering as a synonym (the use of plastering dates to the 15th century). Jay's use of shelling also dates to the 16th century. I however don't get why/how shelling can get replaced by shellacking.

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Re: Know your English

Postby shibi » Sun Nov 07, 2010 3:33 pm

I am surprised that I knew that the word "shellac" had something to do with warnish/polish. Jay

The word Shellac is widely used by plumbers, polishers in Kerala that most people would come across the word during the normal course of life.

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Re: Know your English

Postby jayakris » Sun Nov 07, 2010 3:43 pm

Yeah, exactly. That is probably why I knew it. But had no specific memory of hearing it in Kerala though. Jay

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Re: Know your English

Postby suresh » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:03 am

Describing Sachin Tendulkar a "pocket rocket", Australia's new pace sensation Pat Cummins is excited at the prospect of "versing" the "rockstar".


This is the first instance in my life where I have seen the use of "versing" -- I guess it is meant to be a verb form of versus. If so, it is truly an ugly construction. Any thoughts?

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Re: Know your English

Postby kujo » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:38 am

number 1 thought: you are old
number 2: you haven't played many video games.... :)

relevant links:
http://maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2 ... -of-sports
http://maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2 ... ersing-you

Someone like him, all the fame, it'd be on a whole new different level versing him," Cummins added.

On the subject of kids using "verse" as a new way of saying "play," @Microgeek writes:
I'm all for making up words. Let the kids have their "versing."
So, I guess, a scrimmage in practice would be preversing.
Repeating a match due to rainout, tie, some other reason would be reversing.
Playing against yourself would be universing.
If your team has to travel for matches, I guess you would be traversing.
If the teams somehow get all discombobulated and get the goals backward, would they be conversing?


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