Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

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Re: Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

Postby janetfdoss » Wed May 13, 2015 4:58 am

Amazing article. I loved the information you have shared it with us.

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Re: Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

Postby suresh » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:35 am

It is interesting to see that top 6 Indian players in singles today (Rankings date: October 26, 2015) have pursued/are pursuing four different paths to a tennis career. First the rankings:

Code: Select all

1. Yuki Bhambri 105
2. Saketh Myneni 168
3. Somdev Devvarman 181
4. Ramkumar Ramanathan 251
5. Sanam K. Singh 271
6. Vijay Sundar Prashanth 376

The paths chosen:

  • Yuki has financed himself and played the senior circuit after playing extensively on the junior circuit.
  • Saketh, Somdev and Sanam went to the college in the US and played NCAA tennis in a Division 1 school before starting their professional careers.
  • RamK did not play the junior circuit but was sent to Spain by TNTA and has had extensive financial backing.
  • VSP did not play a lot in the junior circuit and directly started on his pro career. He was supported by TNTA during his junior days. He chose to finance himself by becoming a pro in Europe.

So four distinct paths that have been pursued. I hope more players like RamK emerge. This would mean that our tennis associations are good at identifying good players at a young age and supporting them.

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Re: Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

Postby sameerph » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:34 am

A few years ago after Somdev broke thru going thru the US college route that seemed to be the best path to follow for Indian players. Currently, 5 our of top 10 players have come thru that path ( Somdev, Saketh, Sanam, Jeevan, KU). But, then I still believe going to college means that you are essentially taking a lot of time out from your prime tennis years and devote it to something else (studies). It may be good from player security point of view but purely from the standpoint of development of players that may not be ideal particularly for highly talented players. For instance, someone like Saketh only started pro tennis at 24 and he is already 28 when he started to peak.

The ideal path would be a mix of Yuki and RamK. RamK had major part of his early training in Spain while Yuki had only periodic stints with NBTA in Florida but otherwise it was in India. We must give credit to Aditya Sachdeva for that although as he tries to go to top 50, Yuki may need to engage a coach who has more experience at that level. Also Yuki played a lot of junior tennis at a high level which would have given him more confidence later which RamK did not have.

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Re: Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

Postby jaydeep » Tue Sep 20, 2016 5:13 pm

Nice interview by Rafa with Sukhwant Basra, where he give importance to hard work and good strong legs :) ... Also some nice words about Adil, who is training at Nadal academy.

Sport not all about work, need to have fun too: Rafa Nadal
“You can’t think about Federer, you can’t think about Novak (Djokovic), (Andy) Murray, about me....You can’t think that high. That’s too much pressure. You need to think of real things,” he explains, with a shrug. Nadal believes that it’s about doing things step by step and doing them systematically. “When I was a kid, I never thought of winning one Grand Slam. I (was) just thinking of improving everyday and be (a) better player. That’s the way (in) my opinion.”
“If you have the right people around you, they know how much you need to work, how much you need to rest, how much you need to work on your physical performance.”
“Important to work well on court. That’s the most important thing. On court, you work on the physical performance and off court, you can do crazy things but you need to have fun.” He stresses the fun bit; sport, according to Nadal, can’t be all work, it needs to be more about play. “(It’s) important to have fun, to be happy. You need to do things that make you happy. But at the same time if you have to work, you work 100%...”
“(Legs) is everything. Without good legs you can’t hit the ball well (laughs), that’s for sure.” From strength of limb he instantly switches to strength of mind. “...and without mentality you can’t compete at the highest level. It’s a combination of different things to become a professional tennis player.”

Nadal’s connect with India has got stronger since he took budding junior Adil Kalynapur, former Davis Cup player Vishal Uppal’s ward, under his wing on scholarship. “He (Adil) is practising well at Mallorca with my uncle and coaches. He plays so good, no? I practised with him (a) few months ago. He has good potential and needs to work hard as everybody (needs to) when you are a young player. He is doing well so we have confidence.”

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Re: Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

Postby jaydeep » Tue Dec 20, 2016 4:39 pm

Nice blog entry on the universal tennis site.

Feeding and Control Drills: The Comfort Food of Tennis Academies

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Re: Career Path for Aspiring Tennis Players (Article)

Postby jaydeep » Sat Feb 11, 2017 2:17 pm

Despite Decent Earning, Here's How Tough It Is To Be A Professional Tennis Player In India
Ramkumar says, "One of the industry norms for a coach is 1,000 a week as fees, travel and stay expenses and 10-15 per cent of the prize money. But it varies depending upon the scale of the tournament." Last year, Ramkumar played over 20 tournaments, from the qualifiers of big shows like Wimbledon and French Open to smaller events in places like Ho Chi Minh City, Samarkand and podunk towns in America. If he had a coach with him, he’d have paid $25,000 in fees. He made nearly $78,000 in prize money last year, of which about $8,000 would have been the coach’s cut. In all, he’d be paying the coach about $33,000 (Rs 22 lakh plus). Add travel and stay expenses for the player and the coach. And in an ideal world, a physical trainer should travel with him too. Maybe a crore a year would al low him to travel with a trainer as well. But it is not an ideal world. So, Ramkumar says, "Rs 50 lakh would be a good budget."

Joint effort so far, Ramkumar has been financed, at various points, by his father, his own earnings, the International Management Group (IMG) and the Tamil Nadu Tennis Association (TNTA). The TNTA’s vice-president is Karti Chidambaram, an outspoken tennis buff and the son of P Chidambaram, the former finance minister of India. (Karti once said Ramkumar wasn’t easy to get along with. Asked about the comment, he tells ETPanache, "I said that but that’s his personality. We are not looking for a son-in-law. We are looking for a tennis player.")

AITA’s criticism In the recent past, Somdev Devvarman and Bhambri have lambasted the All India Tennis Association (AITA). Karti, too, said the federation had failed in supporting promising players. He says that India can easily afford to back its players, but the AITA hasn’t shown the will. "You need to spend about Rs 3-4 crore a year on about six players. It’s doable," Karti says. "Yuki was a huge opportunity wasted. He was the world no. 1 junior and junior Australian Open champion. Any country with half a tennis federation would call him and say ‘Hire whichever coach you want and we will pay for him’. What did the AITA do? They don’t have any program to nurture talent.".


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